New York Eye and Ear Infirmary
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Facial Nerve Function

Principal Investigator: Christopher J. Linstrom, M.D., Carol A. Silverman, Ph.D.

Enrollment Status: Open

Objective: The deformity associated with paralysis of the facial nerve from disease or injury is more marked, distressing, and disfiguring than that associated with any other cranial-nerve paralysis. Computer-assisted approaches towards objective assessment of facial movement represent a recent focus of facial-nerve studies. The goal is to employ advanced video and computer motion analysis system to evaluate facial function in order to understand the natural course of facial disorders and to objectively asses the efficacy of various surgical and medical treatments for facial-nerve paresis and paralysis.

Overview: Our department has been applying this new noninvasive technology to individuals with facial-nerve dysfunction, as well as normal individuals. Initially, our focus was on the quantification of the asymmetry in displacement of selected light-reflective markers placed at specific facial landmarks in persons with facial dysfunction. We are now monitoring the changes in facial function prior to and post medical and surgical treatment of individuals with facial dysfunction. We also are currently applying this technology to study facial synkinesis (unintended motion of one part of the face during intentional movement elsewhere on the face) and to identify passive facial motion in persons with severe facial dysfunction. Our pilot study received funding from the Ira W. DeCamp Foundation, New York, NY.

Eligibility: Research subjects are being recruited for this study. If you are a physician treating unilateral facial nerve paralysis, please contact Dr. Linstrom for participation details.

Contact Information: Christopher Linstrom, M.D., (212) 979-4200

Publications & Presentations:

Linstrom CJ, Silverman CA, Colson, D. Facial motion analysis with a video and computer system after treatment of acoustic neuroma. Otology & Neurotology 2002 4:572-579. [Abstract]

Linstrom CJ. Objective facial motion analysis in patients with facial nerve dysfunction. Laryngoscope. 2002 1129-1147. [Abstract]

Linstrom CJ, Silverman CS. Objective assessment of facial motion in persons with facial dysfunction. Paper presented at the IXth International Facial Nerve Symposium, School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA, July 2001.

Linstrom CJ, Silverman CA, Susman WM. Facial-motion analysis with a video and computer system: a preliminary report. American Journal of Otology 2000 1:123-129. [Abstract]

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Preliminary Results:

Preliminary ResultsA. The mean displacement (resultant vector), as a function of time, at the left and right lateral commissures during the closed-lip smile expression for one of the normal subjects. B. The mean velocity (resultant vector), as a function of time, at the left and right lateral oral commissures during the close-lip smile expression. C.  The mean acceleration (resultant vector), as a function of time, at the left and right lateral oral commissures during the closed-lip smile expression. These data were obtained from a normal subject. Reprinted from Linstrom et al. Facial-motion analysis with a video and computer system: a preli minary report. American Journal of Otology 2000 1:123-129.

Related Information: Other Research Projects in Neuro-Otology & Audiology

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