Quadrifilar Electromyography in Facial Nerve Paralysis

 

Principal Investigator: James CL Li, M.D.

Enrollment Status: Open

Objective: Facial nerve weakness is a devastating condition that can be that result of multitude of causes, including infection, trauma and surgery. The degree of injury can range from mild weakness to complete paralysis. Our understand and treatment for facial nerve injury is still limited. One objective is to understand facial nerve injury from an electrophysiological standpoint. This will lead to better assessment of degree of injury soon after its onset and the likelihood for good recovery. Studies involving laryngeal nerves are likewise underway in the Department.  

Overview: This project is studying facial nerve disorder using advanced electromyographic techniques. Special recording probes (Quadrifilar) and a signal processing algorithm allows multi-vector recording and analysis of electrical signals from a muscle. Our Department is applying this new technology to a patient population having unilateral facial nerve weakness for the purpose of improving assessment (diagnosis) and prediction of recovery (prognosis), which has historically proven difficult for this clinical condition. This project is funded by an Empire Clinical Research Investigator Award.

Departmental Co-Investigators are Rick Roark, Ph.D. and Steven Schaefer, M.D.

Eligibility: Research subjects are being recruited for this study. If you are a physician treating unilateral vocal fold paresis of known etiology, please contact Dr. Li for participation details.

Contact Information: James CL Li, M.D., (212) 979-4200

Selected Publications & Presentations:

Roark RM, Li JCL, Schaefer SD, Adam A, De Luca CJ. Multiple Motor Unit Recordings of Laryngeal Muscles: The Technique of Vector Laryngeal EMG. Laryngoscope 2002, 112:2196-2201. [Abstract]

Li JCL, Roark RM, Schaefer SD, Adam A. Decomposition of Laryngeal Electromyographic Signals. Presentation at The American Laryngological Association, Orlando, FL, April 2000.

Related Information: Other Research Projects in Electrophysiology

 

 

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