New York Eye and Ear Infirmary Awarded $2.5 Million Federal Grant to Study Language in Children with Cochlear Implants

NYEE Awarded Federal Grant to Study Language in Children with Cochlear Implants

Elizabeth Ying, Supervisor of Hearing Habilitation of the NYEE Ear Institute, participates in the study and works extensively with children who have had cochlear implants.

New York, NY (December 2010) -- The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary has been awarded a five-year $2.5 million grant by the NIH- National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders to fund a study, Language Processing in Children with Cochlear Implants, by Richard G. Schwartz, Ph.D., Director of the Language and Hearing Research Laboratory at the Ear Institute at the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary and Presidential Professor of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences at The Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

The research will investigate how children with cochlear implants acquire language compared with their normal-hearing peers. Although cochlear implantation as early as possible in children who are deaf is successful in providing sufficient hearing to acquire oral language, little is known about the detailed language outcomes. This research project will examine vocabulary knowledge and processing in understanding and speaking using state-of-the-art methods.

Findings of the study should help improve approaches by speech therapists as they evaluate and work with very young children with cochlear implants, optimizing the way they learn speech and language. The study will use control groups consisting of normal hearing children (ages 5-11 years) and children with cochlear implants (ages 7-11years). Families interested in being part of this study, please contact Dr. Richard Schwartz at (646) 438-7838.

Media Information

If you are a reporter seeking an interview with a doctor at The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, please contact Jean Thomas, at (212) 979-4274. 

 

 

Home > New York Eye and Ear Infirmary Awarded $2.5 Million Federal Grant to Study Language in Children with Cochlear Implants